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Fentanyl & Carfentanil Deadly for Law Enforcement

It’s a well-established fact that fentanyl and carfentanil, two of the most deadly opioids known to man, are killing people by the thousands. Fentanyl is an opioid medication used for surgery and chronic pain, and it is 50-100 times more powerful than morphine. Carfentanil, its Read More »

 
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Opioids: An American Mass Murderer

This country has a serious opioid addiction problem. The number of fatal overdoses from both prescription painkillers and heroin an hour died from an opioid overdose that year. Approximately 2.35 million Americans had diagnosable opioid addictions in America, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Read More »

 
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DEA Orders Production Cut for Opioids in 2017

Each year, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) sets regulations on the amounts of controlled drugs that are allowed to be manufactured. Over the past three years, the DEA allowed 25% more opioid production than usual. The year 2014 set the record for deaths from drug Read More »

 
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World’s Most Dangerous Drug? Carfentanil makes its case

You’ve heard of Morphine. It’s an opioid painkiller administered by health professionals worldwide every day. If you’ve ever been hurt badly enough to be hospitalized, there’s a good chance you were given Morphine for the pain. Morphine is actually listed as one of the two Read More »

 
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Substance Abuse & the Elderly: A Growing Issue

Be prejudiced for a moment. In your mind, picture a drug addict. Picture a jobless, alcoholic man with a Xanax addiction who lives alone and can barely afford to pay his utility bills. He’s so out of touch with modern society that he doesn’t have Read More »

 
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“Super-Prescribers” are being Placed on Aetna Watchlist

Picture a bottle of opioid pills, such as oxycodone. Now think about 280 million bottles of opioid pills. That’s how many are given to patients annually. The actual number of pills given out per year is in the billions. In a society all too familiar Read More »

 
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Homeless, Addicted, Incarcerated – Breaking the Cycle

Homeless Homelessness is an epidemic on its own. On any given night, over 630,000 people in the US are homeless. For obvious reasons, the homeless suffer from a multitude of issues, including hunger, sleeplessness, harassment, and hypothermia in seasonal areas. Sadly, one quarter of all Read More »

 
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Heroin Overdose: A Picture of Abuse

I can describe a cactus. I can tell you about its thick, bulbous leaves, and how they’re covered in spines. I can explain how the cactus has dry, tannish spots on its leaves, and how tall the cactus is. I can literally read the dictionary Read More »

 
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Maryland Governor Spends $3 Million to Fight Drug Abuse & Crime

The state of Maryland has a heroin problem. Baltimore has even been dubbed the “heroin capital of America.” Studies have shown 1 in 10 Baltimore residents to be heroin addicts. The rest of the state is plagued as well, with overdose rates soaring in multiple Read More »

 
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Tara Bealer: College Professor. Community Activist. Heroin Dealer.

The story of a heroin dealer all too often ends with an overdose. In the case of 42-year-old Northampton Community College professor Tara Bealer, the story begins with an overdose. Last year, Tara Bealer was living a normal life with her daughter in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. Read More »

 
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