Opioids & Heroin Epidemic

opioid and heroin epidemicThe opioid epidemic is a serious problem in America today. In the late 1990s and early 2000s, prescription opioid drugs were touted as low-risk solutions for chronic pain and other conditions. Thousands upon thousands of people all across the country were led to assume that opioid drugs were relatively safe solutions to temporary or chronic pain, and these days, almost everyone in America knows somebody whose life has been negatively affected by these dangerous drugs.

As the use of prescription opioid drugs became more and more widespread, another equally destructive problem continued to simmer in the background: heroin abuse. In recent years, these two disparate issues have combined into a maelstrom that is ravaging the country. By learning more about the origins of the opioid epidemic, you can insulate yourself against the dangers that this mounting trend poses.

What Are Opioids?

Opioids are a class of drugs that block pain by directly interacting with pain circuits in the brain. In addition to reducing the sensation of pain, these drugs also produce a euphoric high that quickly becomes addictive. When opioid drugs are used in their prescribed concentrations, they can be effective short-term tools for fighting pain, but abusing these drugs quickly results in addiction.

The original opioid was opium, which was used in the ancient world for analgesic and recreational purposes. Opium is extracted from the bud of the poppy flower, and it is also known as the “milk of the poppy.” While opium itself isn’t widely used in the West anymore, every type of synthetic opioid is in some way derived from the substance. For instance, morphine was one of the first isolate opioids to be extracted from opium, and it is still widely used in medical settings today.

Morphine is much more powerful than normal opium, and the first signs of opioid abuse in America began with cases of morphine addiction in the mid-20th century. However, another synthetic opioid known as oxycodone rapidly supplanted morphine as the go-to drug for cases of pain that were moderate to severe. Today, oxycodone is widely known by its brand names OxyContin and Percocet, and it is one of the main drivers of the opioid epidemic.

As medical drugs like morphine and oxycodone gained popularity in the mainstream, another type of opioid steadily crept into American homes from the shadows. Known as heroin, this morphine derivative is of much lower quality than other types of opioid drugs, and since it is made by criminal drug gangs, there is no way for end users to guarantee that their supply is safe. This drug is usually cut with cheaper substances, and long-term users often inject it into their bodies with needles that may or may not be safe.

Heroin powder is white in its pure form, but most types of street heroin are brown due to additives. An even more insidious type of this drug is also available to street users: black tar heroin. It is either gummy or hard as a rock and derives its name from its black color. This type of heroin is the cheapest, but it is also more likely to be filled with pollutants than any other form of this street drug.

In recent years, however, a street drug that’s even more dangerous than heroin has made its debut. While fentanyl is used in hospitals under extreme circumstances, this drug is also manufactured in China and other countries and smuggled into the United States for illicit use. If fentanyl were just another opioid like oxycodone or morphine, it would be easier to lump this drug into the existing opioid crisis. However, fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is much stronger than others traditionally manufactured in the pharmaceutical industry.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has estimated that fentanyl is 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine. As an abused substance, fentanyl had its debut as an incredibly potent designer drug that was mainly used by wealthy coastal elites. As prices of fentanyl have dropped, however, it has been much more widely used.

These days, it’s common to find fentanyl included in bags of street heroin. Many users are unaware of the presence of this drug in their supply, and they may choose to use their regular dose immediately upon receiving a new bag of drugs that has fentanyl in it. The results of this choice can be disastrous. Because fentanyl is so much stronger than normal heroin, it’s far easier to overdose on heroin that has been spiked with this highly potent synthetic drug.

What Is Fueling the Epidemic?

There are a number of factors that are contributing to the ongoing prevalence of the opioid epidemic in the United States. It’s possible to trace the origins of this pressing social issue back to earlier days of heroin abuse in the United States. During the waning decades of the 20th century, heroin became more and more popular throughout the country. When opium production spiked in Afghanistan in the years following 9/11, this problem only became worse.

Today, it appears that a significant amount of heroin is still coming into the U.S. from foreign countries. While cocaine and marijuana seizures on the country’s borders have decreased in recent years, heroin seizures have increased in some areas. Additionally, although there is no statistical information yet available on fentanyl seizures along the border, a U.S. citizen was recently arrested while attempting to smuggle nearly 11,500 fentanyl pills across the San Ysidro Port of Entry. Fentanyl is so powerful that a batch of pills of that size could easily poison a sizeable town.

Despite the fact that fentanyl poses such a danger to users, companies in China and other countries continue to produce this drug. In many cases, these companies often sell fentanyl directly to American citizens over the dark web. In other situations, fentanyl is smuggled into the country for illicit use. However, increased awareness of the dangers of this drug is minimizing the domestic market for fentanyl.

Historically, one of the biggest impediments to halting the opioid crisis has been domestic opioid manufacturers. For instance, the manufacturers of OxyContin, Purdue Pharma, once claimed in their official materials that their prescription opioids were safer than morphine and other types of opioid drugs. These types of misguided marketing campaigns led many doctors to believe that some opioids were safer than others. In many parts of the country, prescriptions for these drugs increased. For example, in the state of West Virginia, 110 opioid prescriptions were written for every 100 people in 2013 at the height of the opioid crisis. While certainly not all of these prescriptions were illegitimate, the sheer number of pills being prescribed made the drugs much more widely available for use.

The rise of prescription painkillers has even had a bleed-over effect into heroin abuse. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), using prescription opioid drugs increases the likelihood that you will use heroin. This phenomenon is partially fueled by the fact that this drug is generally cheaper than prescription opioids, and it’s easy to find a supply of heroin even when your doctor refuses to prescribe you any more opioids.

To briefly recap, here are the most prominent reasons why the opioid crisis is still a significant problem in the United States:

  • Medical: Doctors have prescribed much higher doses of opioids than are safe for extended periods of time.
  • Smuggling: Many tons of opioids have come over the U.S. border in recent decades. These drugs continue to be smuggled into the country.
  • Plentiful supply: The dangers of opioids are becoming better known, but these drugs are still widely produced and prescribed.
  • Prescription and illicit overlap: Since both heroin and prescription opioid drugs are widely available, it’s easy for addicts to remain addicted.

What Is Being Done

In recent years, greater attention has been paid to the problems that have arisen from increased opioid drug use in the United States. The Trump Administration declared that the opioid epidemic is a Public Health Emergency in 2017. This declaration has brought more attention to the blight of opioid drugs in American communities, and members of the Trump administration have begun coordinating with local officials around the country. Alongside the highest office in the land, policymakers and medical professionals across the United States are leading a national conversation focused on how to best combat this issue in local communities that each face their own unique problems.

The greater emphasis on border security has also helped decrease the supply of opioids entering our country illegally. While keeping illicit opioids from passing through our points of entry will ultimately require the help of other nations, every border seizure of heroin or fentanyl is another batch of drugs that won’t make it into the hands of Americans who suffer from opioid addiction. The incoming Obrador administration in Mexico has promised to work with the U.S. government to fight the power of the cartels in Central and South America. In addition, better diplomatic relations with China will inevitably lead to decreased fentanyl production.

An increased public awareness of the danger that opioids pose has been the most effective measure in curbing the spread of this epidemic. While stopping the drug supply is one half of the equation when it comes to stamping out the opioid menace, education is another critical part of this initiative. An informed populace will be less likely to make decisions that are harmful, and adults who have been educated regarding the dangers of opioids will pass their knowledge down to their children. In decades past, Americans were largely unaware of the dangers that opioids posed to themselves and their communities. However, the American people have woken up to the problem and many are actively working to find a solution.

Increased prevalence of abuse-deterrent formulations (ADFs) in prescription pills has made it harder for people to abuse drugs like OxyContin and Percocet. However, ADFs aren’t present in the majority of prescription opioids, and they aren’t present in any illicit drugs like fentanyl or heroin.

If more people become aware of the dangers of opioid drugs, and if fewer opioids are made available to the populace, this fire will naturally extinguish itself. In the raging blaze that is opioid addiction, the drugs themselves are the wood and ignorance about the dangers of opiates is the oxygen. When starved of these vital components, any fire has no choice but to go out. By surrounding this problem from all sides, we are making the gradual destruction of this danger to our well-being a guaranteed inevitability.