Category Archives: Heroin

Tara Bealer: College Professor. Community Activist. Heroin Dealer.

The story of a heroin dealer all too often ends with an overdose. In the case of 42-year-old Northampton Community College professor Tara Bealer, the story begins with an overdose.

Tara Bealer Arrested

Tara Bealer Arrested

Last year, Tara Bealer was living a normal life with her daughter in Nazareth, Pennsylvania. She was a sociology professor at both Stroudsburg University and Northampton Community College. She had recently founded Renew LeHigh Valley, a program designed to employ local young professionals in various fields. Everything about Bealer seemed wholesome.

Then, on November 21, a heroin overdose occurred inside the Bealer residence. During the course of the investigation, “heroin packaging was found,” according to Police Commissioner Randall Miller.

Leading a Double Life

The discovery of heroin packaging was not enough to charge Bealer with a crime, but she was under watch by the police. Then, in January, an anonymous tip was given to the police about Bealer. She was apparently selling up to 50 bags of heroin a day out of her home. The investigation from November promptly continued, and police discovered “cash, 68 used bags of heroin, and straws for inhaling the drug,” according to LeHigh Valley News.

She was arrested and committed to Northampton County Prison on the following charges: four counts of felony possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, one count of felony endangering the welfare of a child, six counts of misdemeanor possession of a controlled substance, two counts of possession of marijuana, and a whopping 71 counts of misdemeanor drug paraphernalia possession.

The trouble didn’t stop there.

The True Self Appears

Bealer posted the $50,000 bail after being arrested and still faces the above-mentioned charges. However, since posting bail, Bealer has failed two marijuana drug tests and was charged with a DUI for alcohol in February, her third DUI offense. She now must wear a SCRAM bracelet, which monitors alcohol use 24/7. Literally embedded in the skin, the bracelet can detect alcohol consumption at any level.

To Bealer’s credit, four other drug tests came back negative, and she has yet to miss either a court session or a drug rehabilitation class. She is allowed contact with her daughter while on bail, however her teaching positions have been suspended.

The fact of the matter is that drug dealers have no visual identity. From the man on the street to literally the woman teaching sociology at the local community college, drug peddlers can be anywhere.

The American Opioid Epidemic

 

Between 2000 and 2014, American rates of death from opioid overdose have tripled from three deaths per 100,000 people to nine per 100,000. That adds up to 28,647 deaths in 2014. While the number of heroin overdoses has made a rapid climb, the majority of the lethal overdoses involve prescription opioids  –  and the heroin crisis is closely tied to prescription drugs, since many users become addicted to a prescription opioid before switching to the street drug. In March 2015, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell announced an initiative targeting three priority areas to tackle the opioid epidemic and help save lives. These include: improving prescribing practices, expanding access to and the use of medication-assisted treatment, and expanding the use of naloxone.

The abuse of opioids, a group of drugs that  includes heroin and prescription painkillers has had a devastating impact on public health in this country. According to the CDC approximately 100 Americans died from drug overdose every day in 2010. Prescription drugs were involved in well over half of the 38,300 recorded fatal overdoses and opioid pain relievers were involved in 16,600 of those deaths.

Overdose Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics

Research shows that many non-medical users obtain prescription medications from family and friends.

How Different Misusers of Pain Relievers Get Their Drugs

Today, more Americans die from drug overdoses than car crashes or gun fatalities. In total, drug overdoses killed 47,000 people in the United States in 2014, the latest year for which data is available. That’s 130 deaths per day, on average.

 

The majority of those deaths – 29,000, or 80 per day – involved an opioid.

Between 1999 and 2014, the overdose epidemic spread from a few concentrated pockets in Appalachia and northern New Mexico to nearly every corner of America. The opioid overdose crisis began early in central Appalachia, a region encompassing much of West Virginia and eastern Kentucky. The largely rural area – dominated by physically taxing industries, including coal mining, agriculture and timbering – was susceptible to the pain-relief promise of prescription opioids such as OxyContin and Vicodin. These painkillers were aggressively marketed throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. As prescriptions proliferated, so did misuse and abuse. In central Appalachia, as in many parts of the country, the prescription painkiller epidemic also fuelled the influx of a cheap, alternative opioid: heroin. As painkiller-related deaths began to fall in the early 2010s following federal and state crackdowns on prescription opioids, heroin-related deaths began to rise.

In the west, New Mexico showed earliest signs of the looming overdose crisis, but Utah was not far behind. The state’s overdose death rate climbed steadily during the early 2000s, driven by growing prescription opioid dependence. But Utah lawmakers took action early. In 2007, they established a two-year public health-based program to combat painkiller misuse. Over the next three years, prescription opioid-related overdose deaths dropped more than 25%, but the success was short lived. After funding ran out in 2010, deaths began to climb again. Drug overdose deaths in Utah continue to be fueled by prescription painkiller misuse, often in combination with other depressant drugs . Though heroin deaths have made a smaller impact in the state, they are also on the rise. Now, six years after the Prescription Pain Medication Program program ended, the Utah house of representatives declared drug overdose deaths to be a public health emergency, and passed a slate of new public health measures, including the legalization of needle-exchange programs.

New England Opioid Overdose RatesNew England is grappling with a more recent scourge. Since 2013, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and other north-eastern states have seen large spikes in overdose deaths attributed to increasing heroin use and the introduction of a new deadly drug: Fentanyl. Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 times more potent than heroin, first appeared in the region around 2012, making its way down from Canada. Suppliers often cut the drug into heroin or other substances before selling it to users who may not know exactly what they’re buying. Because of its strength – and users’ unfamiliarity with it – fentanyl has proven particularly deadly.

In the face of these new challenges, Massachusetts and other north-eastern states have begun to expand prevention efforts and access to treatment programs. Naloxone, a drug that can reverse opioid overdoses, has become more widely available throughout the region and local harm-reduction initiatives are being tested.

 

Meanwhile, Fentanyl has surfaced in several more states, including Ohio and Florida.

Florida, once known as the prescription drug capital of America. began cracking down on “pills mill” clinics in 2010. Soon after, the state’s drug overdose death rate took a downward turn, declining through 2013.But by 2014, deaths were inching back up in Florida too.

Florida did a good job of cracking down on the supply side, but at the same time they actually cut treatment funding. Not addressing the demand side of the problem has contributed to the continuing of the epidemic.

Though postponed for a few years, Florida’s overdose crisis has progressed along a familiar pattern: a wave of prescription opioid abuse followed by heroin and, soon after, fentanyl.

More recently, fentanyl has cropped up in a previously unseen form: fake Xanax pills. The “death pills”, as they have become known, have also been found in California, Indiana and other parts of the mid-west.

Opioid Overdose DeathsIn October 2015, the President issued a Memorandum to Federal Departments and Agencies directing important steps to combat the prescription drug abuse and heroin epidemic. You can find it here.

In March 2016 HHS awarded $94 million to health centers in Affordable Care Act funding to help treat the prescription opioid abuse and heroin epidemic in America. This funding covers 271 health centers in 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico to improve and expand the delivery of substance abuse services in health centers, with a specific focus on treatment of opioid use disorders in underserved populations.

Administered by the HHS Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), these awards to health centers across the country will increase the number of patients screened for substance use disorders and connected to treatment, increase the number of patients with access to MAT for substance use disorders and opioid treatment, and provide training and educational resources to help health professionals make informed prescribing decisions. This $94 million investment is expected to help awardees hire approximately 800 providers to treat nearly 124,000 new patients.

Research demonstrates that a whole-patient approach to treatment through a combination of medication and counseling and behavioral therapies is most successful in treating opioid use disorders. In 2014, over 1.3 million people received behavioral health services at health centers, This represents a 75 percent increase since 2008 and was made possible with support from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Recovery Act.

 

Opioid Treatment Options are Available

If you can’t stop taking a drug even if you want to, or if the urge to use drugs is too strong to control, even if you know the drug is causing harm, you might be addicted to opiates. Are you thinking about opioid treatment? Here are some questions to ask yourself:

  1. Do you think about drugs a lot?
  2. Did you ever try to stop or cut down on your drug usage but couldn’t?
  3. Have you ever thought you couldn’t fit in or have a good time without the use of drugs?
  4. Do you ever use drugs because you are upset or angry at other people?
  5. Have you ever used a drug without knowing what it was or what it would do to you?
  6. Have you ever taken one drug to get over the effects of another?
  7. Have you ever made mistakes at a job or at school because you were using drugs?
  8. Does the thought of running out of drugs really scare you?
  9. Have you ever stolen drugs or stolen to pay for drugs?
  10. Have you ever been arrested or in the hospital because of your drug use?
  11. Have you experienced an opioid overdose?
  12. Has using drugs hurt your relationships with other people?

If the answer to some or all of these questions is yes, you might have an addiction. People from all backgrounds can get an addiction. Asking for help is the first important step. Visiting your doctor for a possible referral to opioid treatment is one way to do it. You can ask if he or she is comfortable discussing drug abuse screening and opioid treatment. If not, ask for a referral to another doctor. You can also contact an addiction specialist about opioid rehab. There are 3,500 board-certified physicians who specialize in addiction and opioid treatment in the United States.

Recent Heroin Spike in New Jersey

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that the rate of heroin overdose deaths has nearly tripled since 2010.

“Heroin use is increasing rapidly across all demographic groups,” said Thomas Friedan, the director of the CDC. “In just a decade, the landscape changed … Around one in 50 (heroin-users) may die each year from their addiction.”

It was a stark statement directly addressing the startling rise in heroin use across the country in recent years.

As dire is the situation nationwide, the epidemic is much worse in New Jersey.

An analysis by NJ Advance Media shows that the heroin overdose death rate in New Jersey is more than triple the rate released by the CDC on 7/6/16 and now eclipses homicide, suicide, car accidents and AIDS as a cause of death in the state.

In Camden and Atlantic counties, heroin kills more people annually than the flu and pneumonia combined, state Department of Health data show.

Heroin is pouring into New Jersey via Port Elizabeth and Port Newark.

It’s often the first port-of-call for the drug, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation said heroin in the state is purer than it’s ever been.  Bags are increasingly being laced with other substances, like powerful fentanyl, which itself was related to 143 deaths in the state last year – adding another twist to an already intractable problem for law enforcement officials.

During a briefing, the CDC said one of the most glaring revelations of their study was how heroin usage was growing across the country. Women, white people, adults aged 18 to 25 and people in higher income brackets – historically at low risk for heroin usage – have all been part of the dramatic spikes in abuse of heroin and prescription opioids in recent years.

Increased Legislation

Democratic Senator Joseph Vitale of Woodbridge Township, NJ introduced 21 bills to bolster substance abuse education, treatment and prevention in New Jersey. Most of which were passed into law or sit at Gov. Chris Christie’s desk.

Christie has made it a priority of his administration, announcing in his state-of-the-state that a new treatment hotline would be launched (it did July 1) and millions of dollars would be pushed toward launching jail re-entry programs in five counties. The implementation of heroin reversal drug Naloxone among law enforcement in 2014 saved hundreds of lives across the state, providing a last line of defense against heroin and opioid abuse.

The CDC study also noted that users of prescription drugs are 40 times more likely to use heroin than others, a figure that merges commonly prescribed medication as a threshold for use of more threatening substances.

Such measures, like a voluntary prescription management program have sought to clamp down on overprescribing by doctors, the use of drugs like Oxycontin, Percocet and Vicodin remains pervasive in New Jersey and across the country.

While prescription drugs and heroin are chemical cousins, local enforcement officials said heroin only costs $4 to $6 dollars a bag on the street, while prescription drugs can run a user between five and six times that.

“The conflation between prescription drug use and heroin underscores the need, frankly, for an agonizing reappraisal of access to opiate painkillers,” said former Gov. Jim McGreevey, who now helps administer substance abuse treatment in the Hudson County jail.

Virtually every indicator, from drug arrests to overdoses to treatment figures, show that the heroin crisis has a firm grip on New Jersey.  To McGreevey, word from the CDC that the nation is following in the state’s footsteps is no surprise.

Heroin Addiction Rates are Soaring

Calling heroin addiction in America an epidemic does little justice.  The figures regarding its use, abuse, and overdose rates, both fatal and non-fatal, are bewildering.  Over the last 15 years, heroin addiction rose from being a sincere issue to being an overwhelming tragedy.  Five people died per day in the year 2001 from heroin overdoses, as reported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.  In 2014, just thirteen years later, the number of people who died daily from heroin overdoses rose to 29.  Nearly six times the number of people died, just thirteen years later.

 

THE HEROIN ADDICTION CRISIS

The government’s war on drugs pales in comparison to the war being fought between heroin and everyday people.  Studies conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that heroin abuse rates are rising most rapidly “…in demographic groups with historically low rates of heroin use.”  The CDC also says those in metropolitan areas are most at-risk of becoming addicted to heroin, and that there has also been a significant increase of abuse in non-Hispanic whites, aged 18-25.  So, according to the CDC in a report by US News, those most at risk are people in cities and young white adults.  That seems to be a lot of people, mostly considering that every year the populations of metropolitan areas grow quickly.

Not only have heroin overdose rates sky-rocketed, so have abuse rates and first-time user rates.  According to the same US News report aforementioned, the rate of heroin dependence literally doubled from 2002 to 2013.  Let it be noted that these statistics take time to compile and verify, and so on a rather grim note, one can only imagine what these numbers will be for this year.  Let us only pray that for 2017 and beyond we can end, or at least start to end, this heroin addiction crisis.

heroin-addiction-rates

OUR YOUTH NEEDS ATTENTION

Because child studies are handled differently and are more confidential, proven statistics regarding heroin (and other drug) addiction are more readily available for those aged 18 and over.  That being said, our youth are the age-group most affected by heroin abuse in the 2000s.  The CDC reports five times as many deaths from overdoses for those aged 18-25 from the year 2001 to the year 2013.  Evidence proves our youth need the most attention regarding drug abuse, and this starts with education.  If the perils and hardships of drug abuse are taught at a relatively early age, more so than now, compiled evidence suggests drug abuse rates will diminish.

Just because a young person either has not been exposed to or is not interested in the use of heroin does not mean that young person will not try it.  Again according to the CDC, alcoholics are twice as likely to try heroin than non-addicts, marijuana abusers are three times as likely, cocaine abusers are 15 times as likely, and opioid abusers are 40 times as likely.  The idea of a gateway drug should not be forgotten; it is proven.

 

A SAD CONCLUSION

The American Society of Addiction Medicine compiled a list of facts and figures regarding heroin addiction and overdose.  According to it, drug overdose is the single leading cause of accidental death in the US.  Over 47,000 occurred in 2014.  Nearly half of them were opioid-based, with over 10,000 heroin-related.  At that rate, it’s safe to say that you, the reader, or someone you know is in some way affected by heroin use.  Let’s stop this problem today.

How Heroin Effects Your Brain

heroin-effects-your-brainHeroin effects your brain in more ways then one. When heroin enters your brain it takes over the brains ability to deliver pleasure from anything else. A region of the brain that controls pleasure is the ventral techmental area, or VTA. The VTA is located in the middle of your brain and is stimulated by natural activities such as eating, exercising, and sex. When your VTA is stimulated it releases dopamine which produces pleasure and euphoria throughout your body.

 

How Heroin Effects Your Brain

Heroin binds to opioid receptors in the VTA. As you continue to use heroin and increase the doses you gain a tolerance to it. This turns into the user having to use higher and higher doses to achieve the same effect. This tolerance makes users susceptible to withdrawal symptoms and physical dependence. When withdrawal symptoms begin to emerge the user no longer feels any euphoria or pleasure while using heroin, they only feel relief from warding off the pain of their withdraw symptoms by using more heroin. This produces long-term consequences to where a user will not be able to feel pleasure without using heroin.

 

Don’t Get Caught in the Cycle!

Users are caught into an unforgiving cycle from their first time using. After one use a user will want more. As the users uses more their tolerance will rise without them having any control. When tolerance rises physical dependency comes along with it and using the drug is a necessity. If users try to stop withdraw symptoms will take over their reality, these include nausea, abdominal pain, sweating, shaking, nervousness, agitation, depression, and muscle spasms. At this point of the cycle users feel no pleasure from their heroin intake, only relief from the pain of their withdraw symptoms. Withdraw symptoms are extremely severe and can last about a week however it is possible to battle thru them. It is very likely that after this week long battle the desire for the drug can still last for a life time. For most patients counseling is required to fight thru the viscous cycle that is heroin.

 

Don’t Let Heroin Effect Your Brain!

You can overcome your heroin addiction with the help of addiction treatment professionals. Start the treatment process by calling us today! When being admitted into an addiction treatment center you will go through an initial intake assessment to help staff get you into an individualized treatment plan.

From there, you will move onto a detoxification process to cleanse your body of the harmful toxins related to heroin abuse. This will include professionals helping you to ease the symptoms of withdrawal. After you have cleansed your body of heroin you will be admitted into an addiction treatment facility to begin the rehabilitation process.
In rehab, you will go through various therapy and counseling sessions to help you see past your addiction and begin living heroin free. Don’t let heroin effect you any longer!

Quitting Heroin Cold Turkey

Heroin is a highly addictive street drug that claims the lives of thousands of men and women each year. After just one use, many individuals have found themselves drawn to its effects and going back for more. The stigmas of a heroin addict do not deter those looking for relief from pain or an easy escape from reality. Unfortunately before many of those who are just “trying out” the drug, before they know it they are fully addicted and unable to stop its use without pain of withdrawal.

 

Stopping Heroin

long-term-effects-of-heroinFor many heroin addicts the second symptoms of withdrawal start they rush to get a fix. This is because the brain becomes dependent on the drug to function, taking it away causes the body to go into shock and sends nerves backfiring and causing painful symptoms of withdrawal.
Common symptoms of heroin withdrawal include:

  • Cold sweats
  • Depression and anxiety
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unstable moods
  • Muscle cramping
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Seizures

Cold Turkey

While quitting heroin cold turkey is not the best option it is possible to quit on your own. It is important to keep in mind the withdrawal effects you will experience can range in severity from mild discomfort to unbearable pain. Depending on the severity of your addiction you may choose to enter into a detoxification program to find relief from withdrawal symptoms.

Before You Start

Before you start the process of detoxing at home you will need some supplies. For the next 7 days you are going to need to shut yourself off from the outside world. Stock up you home with water and easy to make meals (for when you get an appetite). While you can go without food for a few days you body requires water and during the detox process you could easily dehydrate if you are not drinking water regularly. Water will also help to detoxify the body, regular your body temperature and ease muscle pain. When quitting cold turkey water is one of the most important elements you will need.

You will also what to pick up a few OTC (over the counter) medications.

  • Imodium, anti diarrhea drug containing Loperamide (an opioid drug) that will help to relieve diarrhea, stomach cramps and other withdrawal symptoms when taken at high dosages every 5 to 6 hours or as needed.
  • While heroin withdrawal is 100 times worse than the flu, NyQuil nighttime flu medicine can offer you some relief and help you sleep longer increments of time.
  • Valerian Root Capsules, which is also known as nature’s Valium, is an herbal supplement that can be used to relieve anxiety and restlessness.

There are many other over the counter medications that you can use to find relief when withdrawing from heroin: Phenibut, Pepto-Bismol, Maalox, Mylanta, Emetrol, Nauzene, Dramamine, Kratom, vitamins and supplements.

It’s Easier Said Than Done

Quitting heroin cold turkey is easier said than done. Before you begin the process it is important to speak with your primary care physician to determine if you are in overall good health and can handle the detox process. Heroin withdrawal can be dangerous, be sure to set up to have a friend or family member check in on you on a regular basis to ensure your safety. With commitment and strength you can quit heroin cold turkey.

 

Overcoming Heroin Addiction

Heroin addiction is a growing problem throughout the United States. It does not discriminate on who it consumes, affecting men and women of all walks of life. This highly addictive drug is ripping families apart, taking a once happy person and turning them into a drug seeking zombie that only cares about getting their next fix. With no end in sight, the only thing that can be done is educate the public on the dangers of heroin, speak to our children, and offer our support to those who have fallen victim to heroin addiction.

overcoming-heroin-addiction

Getting Out of the Hole of Addiction

When addicted to heroin is can feel like there is no way out. Stopping heroin results in horrible pain as the body withdrawals, only sending you back to the drug for comfort. If you manage to get past the first 72 hours in withdrawal, if you don’t have the right mindset you can easily fall victim to temptation again. To get out of the hole of addiction you do not only need to admit that you have a problem but to seek treatment to help give you a true foundation to start in your recovery.

 

Turning to Chemical Dependency Treatment Professionals

Sure it is possible to quit cold turkey, but the likelyhood of this being an effective way to kick your heroin addiction is slim. Turning to chemical dependency treatment professionals to undergo detoxification, rehabilitation and aftercare will give you the medical treatment, educational tools and support needed to overcome your addiction to heroin.

 

Starting The Treatment Process

You can overcome your heroin addiction with the help of chemical dependency treatment professionals. First you will go through an intake assessment, this will help staff to determine the severity of your addiction and start putting together an individualized treatment plan.

 

Next you will move onto the detox process where you will begin to cleanse the body of the harmful chemicals and toxins related to heroin abuse. During this time you will be monitored to ensure your health and safety, the doctor will prescribe you medications to ease symptoms of withdrawal.

 

After the physical symptoms of withdrawal have been controlled you will move forward to begin the rehabilitation process. There you will go through various therapy and individual counseling sessions, as well as daily group therapies to help you get a true understanding of your addiction and develop the skills needed to maintain your sobriety in your day to day life.

 

When your Therapist and other clinical staff feel you are ready to return home you will work together with them to create an aftercare plan. This will include an outpatient therapy program, NA meetings, a doctor to monitor your medications and to create a support system for when you return home. All of this will help to keep you on the road of recovery, helping you to overcome heroin addiction and move forward to create a more fulfilling and healthy life for yourself and your family.

 

Want to Learn more about Heroin Addiction?

Resources and Organizations

  1. DrugAbuse.gov – https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/understanding-drug-abuse-addiction
  2. DrugPolicy.org – http://www.drugpolicy.org/drug-facts/heroin-facts
  3. HHS.gov – http://www.hhs.gov/opioids/
  4. American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry

Heroin Addiction Treatment

Heroin addiction is a growing epidemic in the United States. It typically affects young white males between the ages of 18 and 23 years old, however heroin does not discriminate and affects men and women of all ages, races and social backgrounds. Each year thousands of people lose their lives to heroin overdose, nearly 80% of which are deemed accidental.

Taking The First Step

If you are suffering from an addiction to heroin and are ready to take the first step in your recovery by admitting to your problem and asking for help, there are thousands of treatment facilities ready to take you in and help you overcome addiction.

Cleansing The Body

The first aspect in any heroin addiction treatment program will begin with detoxification. This process allows the body to be cleansed of the chemicals and toxins related to heroin abuse. The detoxification process takes place in a hospital-type setting with 24-7 medical supervision to ensure your safety and comfort. Depending on the severity of your addiction you may receive medications to ease symptoms of withdrawal. The detox process can take as little as 3 days, upwards of 2 weeks.

Cleansing the Mind and Soul

The rehabilitation process will help you to cleanse your mind and soul from the damaging effects of heroin addiction. With typical, individual and group counseling, as well as other alternative therapies you will be able to get a better understanding of your addiction and to develop the key tools needed to maintain your sobriety in your daily life.

Regardless to the severity to your addiction, with the right treatment and the self motivation you will be able to overcome heroin addiction and to move forward to living a more fulfilling life in recovery.

Get The Help You Need to Overcome Heroin Addiction

Heroin is a highly addictive drug that causes major changes in the brain making it feel hopeless to get clean. Unfortunately, hundreds of thousands of people die each year from heroin overdose. Some who never were able to get the help they needed to overcome heroin addiction. If you are addicted to heroin, there is help available and it is time to ask for it.

The First Step

The first step to getting the help you need is admitting that you have a problem and asking for help. Turning to friends and family and telling them that you have a problem will help start you on the road to recovery. With thousands of treatment facilities throughout the United States you can find one to meet your needs and offer you the services needed to overcome your addiction to heroin.

Beginning The Detox Process

When abruptly stopping the use of heroin you will begin to experience uncomfortable, even painful, symptoms of withdrawal. The detoxification process is going to be the beginning of your treatment program. This will allow you to safely withdrawal from heroin and to receive medications needed to help ease symptoms of withdrawal. The detoxification process typically takes place for 3 days, depending on the severity of your addiction you may need to stay in a detox program for 1 to 2 weeks.

The Rehabilitation Process

Once the physical effects of your addiction are controlled you can begin to work on the psychological effects. An inpatient rehabilitation program will give you 30 to 90 days in a sober living environment with therapy, individual counseling and group counseling, as well as many other alternative therapies. During this time you will be able to get to the root cause of your addiction and work through it. You will be able to identify and control the triggers to use heroin and develop the skills needed to maintain your sobriety in your daily life.

Death by Overdose, Heroin Addiction

Heroin abuse is a growing epidemic in the United States. SInce 2001 the number of deaths by Heroin overdose have continued to rise at a drastic level. In 2014 more than 10,000 men and 2,000 women died from heroin overdose according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

The effects of Heroin

Heroin is a highly addictive drug, taking no time for a user to develop a dependency. Users are drawn to the drug for its euphoric, numbing effects. It is commonly snorted in powder form or liquified and injected directly into the vein for immediate effects.

Developing a Dependency to Heroin

Prolonged use of the drug results in the brain developing a dependency, unable to function without its effects. When the effects of the drug begin to wear off the individual will begin to experience uncomfortable, even painful symptoms of withdrawal. As quick as the withdrawal begins, a heroin addict will do whatever they can to get their next fix.

Increased Doses Heightens the Risk of Overdose

Regular heroin abusers will develop a tolerance to the drug, requiring larger doses to achieve the desired effects. This makes a dangerous drug even more dangerous. Increases doses of heroin can easily lead to an overdose, resulting in death more times than not. According to the CDC found in 2013, of the 43,982 deaths due to drug poisoning, 81% were unintentional – while 12% were intentional suicides and 6% were of undetermined intent.

Just How Deadly is Heroin?

Heroin has the third most frequent drug related emergency visit with reports showing 258,482 emergency department visits related to heroin use in 2011. In more recent years, there was over 50,000 drug related overdoses in 2014, heroin accounting for 61% of those. With a death rate steadily increasing since 2001, it is clear that Heroin is one of the most deadly illicit drugs in the United States today.